Tag Archives: mountain safety

Are your hill skills up to this new challenge…

This is really a new one on all of us in the office, but two walkers trapped in a forest of rhododendron plants really made for an unusual mountain rescue situation!

hill skills

The spread of non-native rhodedendron plants has been hotly debated on environmental grounds but it looks like there is a whole new mountain safety and hill skills element we hadn’t considered!

 

The Wild Network and more evidence of the importance of wildtime

Our Training Manager Dom Hall spent two days last week as a member of Nature’s Marketing Department!

The Wild Network is a growing group of people concerned about the loss of access we all (but especially kids) have to the great outdoors and their increasingly disappearing connection to nature.  It was really inspiring to see nearly 100 people coming together, giving up their time and skills to try to broaden this access and give more people this opportunity.

We’ve always been passionate about using outdoor first aid,  field safety and outdoor skills training not as a barrier, but an enabler of outdoor activities, to give instructors, teachers and parents the confidence to get out in the outdoors and enjoy its many benefits. So we were delighted that Dom could represent us at the Wild Network event where nearly 100 people from schools, outdoor educators and technical specialists came together to address challenges focused on getting people outdoors.

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So please have a look at the work of the Wild Network, and also it seemed apt to share another article published recently in the Guardian emphasising how important time outdoors is.

Jobs in the outdoors – top tips

On many of our courses, we are asked, “how do I get jobs in the outdoors which use my outdoor skills”.  So here Zoe Allen, guest blogger for Training Expertise, a writer and human resource specialist gives three top ideas for those looking for a career change into the outdoor sector:

So you have got a tight grasp on the concept of risk management, risk reduction, first aid, and field safety. You contemplate if it would be a good move to start pursuing new trails using these valuable skills, but you haven’t found the path just yet. Do not fret – there are a number of options for you to take…

Paramedic

More than just loud sirens, fast rides, and stretchers; paramedics are vital members of the medical workforce. Aside from implementing basic first aid solutions, they are responsible for performing clinical procedures as well as administering drugs. The most dedicated, focused, and adept will be successful paramedics.

Outdoor activities will be a terrific base for developing future skills as a paramedic. Outdoor first aid is definitely a must-learn. The Health Professions Council (HPC) regulates the paramedic selection process, said How2Become. Moreover, they ensure that only the most dedicated and proficient are accepted through a series of assessments that measure commitment and competence.

Liverpool John Moores University lecturer John Ambrose recommends getting a degree in paramedic science. He said that although there are many things to learn in the university, there are skills that cannot be taught such as grace under pressure and sympathy. Taking extra-curricular courses in outdoor first aid, wilderness first aid, and emergency management is a wise move should one choose this career path.

work and train in the outdoors

work and train in the outdoors

Mountain Guide

Those with a passion for trekking and mountaineering will find this career path the perfect job. Along with extensive knowledge in risk management techniques and group leadership, mountain guides have deep knowledge about nature and the environment. Only those with a vast amount of experience under their belts may become professional mountain guides. It can be a long haul thought, a diploma is awarded to a successful trainee only after four to five years of dedicated education.

The British Mountain Guides (BMG) assesses and trains future mountain guides in many forms such as mountaineering, trekking, skiing, or classic climbing. According to their official website, they primarily promote safety and good practice along with enjoyment in climbing. “The requirements for joining the BMG training scheme are that you should have completed approximately 50 routes of E1/5b, a similar amount of British Winter routes at Grade IV/V,” mentions the BMG. 

International Teacher

Teaching might not be the first thing that comes to mind when we hear the words ‘outdoor’ and ‘risk management’. However, these skills that are typically meant for exterior professionals fit perfectly with this job. Environment specific courses are especially designed for individuals to experience and appreciate the nature the world has to offer, in safety. Therefore, a career in teaching abroad would definitely benefit from these skills. Volunteers who teach children in the most remote of locations and unfamiliar landscapes, researchers in the academe that scour the deepest of jungles, teachers of depressed communities – all of them are admirable career paths that are supplemented by training.

Becoming an overseas teacher requires a degree in the specialization one desires. The only other requirement is the ability to fluently speak English. “International schools are looking for proven performers who can hit the ground running and are capable of managing their own classroom independently,” explained Forrest Broman, President of The International Education.

These are only three careers among many where risk reduction, disaster management, first aid, and other outdoor related skills flourish. Are you up for the challenge of these off the beaten paths? Tell us your thoughts in the comments section below.

Zoe Allen is a writer and human resource specialist. As part of her continuing education, she currently researches on the recent trends in the job market. Catch her on Twitter.

If you’d like to learn more about its time for you to update your risk management,  field safety or outdoor first aid skills then just get in touch.

Mountain safety – enjoy the winter hills and stay safe

We hope you had a great Christmas and New year and are making the most of the holiday period to enjoy some mini-adventures to test your outdoor skills.  Windy, wet and wild seem to be the weather conditions of the Christmas and New Year holiday but we hope you are still getting outside and enjoying the hills.  Winter conditions are certainly setting in and even though much of it is in the wet and windy form at the moment there are plenty of things for the winter walker to look out for in terms of mountain safety.

Helvellyn getting its winter coat

Winter conditions in the Lakes. Credit to @Helvellyn for the photo

So make sure you have simple, flexible plans, fit for the weather and the short days. Pack plenty of warm and waterproof gear and then get out and enjoy the outdoors.  The BMC have produced a really useful ‘ten mistakes’ to avoid – so have a good read before heading into the hills.

Water Safety Management – expedition reflections

Business manager Matt has just returned from leading an expedition in South East Asia  and has been reflecting on the challenges of safety near water.

Leading groups of young people overseas relies heavily on good judgement – is this situation safe? How should I control the group and keep them safe, yet let them explore and enjoy beautiful environments?

Reflections on water safety from expedition

training for water safety – water safety management programme with RLSS

Sadly it can be easy for a group playing at the waterside to develop into a dangerous situation rapidly without good management. I reflected how much more confidence courses like the RLSS National Water Safety Manangement Programme can provide in making these judgements.

Picture the scenes:

  • The students are playing volleyball on the beach. They have been working hard for the last week and all they want to do is to cool off in the water, surely having a nice cool splash in the water is just what everyone needs…
  • You are about to board a water taxi across a fast flowing river through the Cambodian jungle…
  • You are sitting by a waterfall in the middle of the forest having just spent all day walking there…

Making judgements is critical – is the water a safe place to be? Should you let the people in your charge in or even near the water?

The RLSS have developed the National Water Safety Management Programme (NWSMP) to help people that work at the water margins. For teachers, group leaders, environmental scientists, dock workers, police officers, construction workers and canal boat owners, this course has proven to be popular across a wide spectrum.

The course looks at the inherent water safety risks associated with different environments; still water, moving water and beach. Participants find themselves learning about group management, risk assessment and rescue techniques.

We have an RLSS NWSMP running on the weekend of the 12-13th October. We also have a, Instructor Certification Course (ICC) running on the 14-15th October, for those people interested in being able to deliver the programme.If you’d be interested in discussing these courses please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

RGS Explore 2013 – Top weekend for all expeditioners

We are delighted that Training Expertise will again be at the RGS Explore conference, the year’s top expedition weekend event.  It is on the 15th to 17th Nov and early bird booking is open NOW! We’re pleased to announce that Business Manager Dom will be speaking on the main stage about practical solutions to risk management in field safety.  He will  also be chairing the tropical forest panel.

We’re really looking forward to it and hope as many of you as possible will be able to join us there. There are lectures, workshops and exhibits to help organise your own expedition or field research projects in a variety of environments and disciplines. Over 90 leading field scientists and explorers to provide inspiration, contacts and advice over the course of this unique weekend.

What’s more there is an early bird booking discount available NOW of just £75 and only £55 for students and under 25s! Full details of the conference and how to book is available at the RGS website.

Mountain safety – carbon monoxide in tents

A new study has further illustrated the potential field safety dangers of carbon monoxide in tents, especially with modern, highly waterproof and airtight tents where levels of poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) from the burning stove can build up fast.

carbon monoxide in tents

mountain safety – danger of carbon monoxide in tents

A small scale study from several Michigan emergency room doctors suggested the type of stove fuel used and the type of tent can make a difference.

It is important for mountain safety that anyone working on remote expeditions through to duke of edinburgh trips in the UK is aware of the issues and has the outdoor skills and outdoor first aid knowledge to take precautions and to treat any potential cases.

To read more about the full findings of the study see the full article here.

 

Casualty’s outdoor first aid advice – and a good cause…

Very interesting to get a casualty’s outdoor first aid advice reflecting on her experience of an accident in Scotland this winter.  Her tips are shared via Andy Kirkpatrick’s great blog and you can also find details of what she is planning to do to raise funds for Lochaber MRT by way of thanks for their help that day.

casualty outdoor first aid advcie

outdoor first aid from the casualty’s point of view

 

Remote first aid and altitude illness training on Kili

We were delighted to recently run a unique outdoor first aid and specialist wilderness medical course on managing altitude illness in Moshi, Tanzania.  Participants were trekking leaders or assistant leaders working for UK holiday company, Explore on Mount Kilimanjaro.

Remote medical training on Kili for altitude illness

Remote medical training on Kili for altitude illness

This systematic and specialised training course makes the attendees one of the most highly trained and skilled teams of guides working on Kilimanjaro.  The training allows the team to competently respond to and manage common wilderness medical and altitude problems.

The first two days covered core outdoor first aid skills culminating in a one hour long ‘major incident’ scenario involving three simulated patients, each of which had with trauma and medical issues to be managed.

The third day was a specialist expedition first aid course dedicated to altitude illness training, covering

• Teaching and discussion based altitude illness training
• Use of a Portable Altitude Chamber
• Presentation of case studies

Participants reported that the training course gave them greater knowledge and built their confidence in dealing with first aid incidents and especitally in managing altitude illness.

If you’d be interested in discussing any training in expedition and wilderness first aid or outdoor first aid training please don’t hesitate to get in touch.